Swedish Sea Rescue


Swedish Sea Rescue

sweden2Swedish Sea Rescue Society´s function has always been that of saving lives at sea. This task is firmly supported on three pillars; an operative, a preventative and a firm commitment to research and development. The Society is focused on continuously meeting the demands and challenges of the future from mariners, authorities and societies.

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A solid ground | New faster rescue vessels | Served by Volunteers | Impressive 100th Anniversary Celebrations | Swedish Sea Rescue Society 2011

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Swedish Sea Rescue Society, saving lives at sea, with no government funding. In case of alarm, the volunteers are set to depart within 15 minutes, at any time, in any weather – 24 hours a day.

sw2The large rescue vessels in the 20-metre Rausing class can cope with extreme conditions, and are equipped with the latest technology, including equipment for searching in the dark using ultraviolet light.
Length: 20 m. Width: 5.1 m. Draught: 0.9 m.
Weight: 30 tonne. Speed: 34 knot.
Designer: Swedish Sea Rescue Society and Rolf Eliasson.

sw3The 12-metre Victoria class was developed by the Swedish Sea Rescue Society’s own engineers after extended research and has achieved worldwide recognition.
Length: 12 m. Width: 4.2 m. Daught: 0.7 m.
Weight: 13 tonne. Speed: 34 knot.
Designer: Swedish Sea Resuce Society och Rolf Eliasson..

sw5The Gunnel Larsson class is an 8-metre open rescue vessel, designed with good ergonomics for the crew members. Used mainly for rescue operations occurring close to land.
Length: 15 m. Width: 4.7 m. Draught: 1.6 m.
Weight: 2.7 tonne. Speed: 34 knot.
Designer: Swedish Sea Rescue Society and Profjord.

sw6Rescuerunner is a special made scooter. While driving, the rider can pick up a person in water within a few seconds. The rescuerunner can also be used in mass rescue at sea.
Length: 3.6 m. Width: 1.5 m. Draught: 0.1-0.3 m.
Weight: 350 kg. Speed: 34 knot.
Designer: Swedish Sea Rescue Society and Fredrik Falkman.

There were many reasons for the formation of a Swedish non-governmental, national sea rescue society at the start of the 20th century. The storms of 1903 were one, a lack of interest on the part of the Swedish government was another, while the formation of a local sea rescue station at Stafsinge, in Halland in 1906 was a third. The person who probably contributed most during these early years was Albert Isakson, a marine construction engineer at Lloyds of London. Albert Isakson took part in the 1903 world conference on sea rescue in Germany, where two countries were highlighted for particularly poor provision of rescue service for shipwrecked mariners: Greece and Sweden! Isakson brought the message home to Sweden and was the driving force at a meeting in Stockholm on June 1st 1907. As a result of the discussions of the representatives for the Swedish shipping industry, the Swedish Sea Rescue Society was formed.

A solid ground.

Swedish Sea Rescue Society´s function has always been that of saving lives at sea. This task is firmly supported on three pillars; an operative, a preventative and a firm commitment to research and development. The Society is focused on continuously meeting the demands and challenges of the future from mariners, authorities and societies. Swedish Sea Rescue Society´s preparations for the future requires an awareness of how maritime life has changed, so that its organization and fleet can be suitably adapted. The infancy of the Society at the beginning of the 20th century was characterized by the needs of rescue crews, along with crews and passengers from vessels in distress at sea. Later, in the 1950s and 60s marine recreation became popular, and this posed new demands to which the Society still devotes a great deal of energy. More recently, new marine leisure activities, often without a vessel, have been developed, such as long-distance ice skating in the winter. This is a new challenge for Swedish Sea Rescue Society that has led to building a small fleet of hovercraft. Future tasks will primarily be to reduce sea rescues, by educating the public about safety at sea. Another goal is to develop new methods for mass rescue at sea globally. A task the Swedish Sea Rescue Society prioritizes.

New faster rescue vessels.

Swedish Sea Rescue Society has 160 vessels ready for use all around the Swedish coast. Speed is of the essence when saving lives, and the organization has therefore invested heavily in its rescue fleet in recent years by building new, modern vessels that achieve high speeds even in heavy seas.

Served by Volunteers.

Swedish Sea Rescue Society is responsible for 70 per cent of all sea rescues in Sweden and receives no government funding. The Society is financed by membership fees, donations and voluntary work. Despite this, or possibly as a result of this, the Society has doubled the number of sea rescue stations in recent years, tripled the number of rescue volunteers available and built 70 modern rescue vessels. This expansion has enabled Swedish Sea Rescue Society to meet its goal of departing within 15 minutes or less from the time an alarm is received. Crews live close to stations and conduct training several times a month. Thanks to 1 800 volunteer crew members, rescue services are always available 24 hours a day anywhere along the Swedish coast and on the major lakes. The volunteers work as carpenters, doctors, fishermen, salesmen, plumbers, teachers and many other occupations. The sea rescue volunteers are willing to go out in any weather, at any time even during normal work hours or in the middle of the night. The large degree of voluntary work enables the Swedish Sea Rescue Society to manage with a small administration, as much of the costs for normal activities are covered by membership fees. The Swedish Sea Rescue Society has more than 75 000 members.

Impressive 100th Anniversary Celebrations.

On the Swedish Sea Rescue Society’s 100th anniversary, June 1st 2007, the 20th World Maritime Rescue Congress opened in Göteborg. The 90 members of the International Maritime Rescue Federation meet every four years to discuss sea rescue and safety at sea and to present long-term action plans. The Congress in 2007 was held in Göteborg and some of the national and international participants brought along their rescue vessels. The fleet of Swedish Sea Rescue Society were wellrepresented, in a well visited cavalcade of both new and older rescue vessels.

Swedish Sea Rescue Society 2011

Rescue stations: 67.
Rescue vessels: 160.
Hovercraft: 12.
Volunteers: 1 800.
Commissions per year: about 7 000, including
alarms, other rescue and training.

Contact us

Address: Box 5025, S-426 76 Västra Frölunda.
Visiting address: Talattagatan 24.
Switchboard: +46 77 579 00 90.
E-mail: info@ssrs.se.
Home page: www.sjoraddning.se.
Facebook: www.facebook.com/sjoraddning.

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